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Posts Tagged ‘haiti’

Haiti by the Numbers

In comment on February 9, 2010 at 12:50 pm

890 million.  Amount of international debt that Haiti owes creditors.  Finance ministers from developing countries announced they will forgive $290 million.  Source: Wall Street Journal.

644 million.  Donations for Haiti to private organizations have exceed $644 million.  Over $200 million has gone to the Red Cross, who had 15 people working on health projects in Haiti before the earthquake.  About $40 million has gone to Partners in Health, which had 5,000 people working on health in Haiti before the quake.   Source:  New York Times.

1 million.  People still homeless or needing shelter in Haiti.  Source: MSNBC.

1 million.  People who have been given food by the UN World Food Program in Port au Prince – another million in Port au Prince still need help.  Source: UN World Food Program.

300,000.  People injured in the earthquake, reported by Haitian Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive.  Source: CNN.

212,000.   People reported killed by earthquake by Haitian Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive.  Source: CNN.

63,000.   There are 63,000 pregnant women among the people displaced by the earthquake.  7,000 women will deliver their children each month.  Source:  UN Populations Fund.

17,000.  Number of United States troops stationed on or off coast in Haiti, down from a high of 22,000.  Source: AFP.

9,000.  United Nations troops in Haiti. Source: Miami Herald.

7,000.  Number of tents distributed by United Nations. Source: Miami Herald.   President Preval of Haiti has asked for 200,000 tents.  Source: Reuters.

4,000.  Number of amputations performed in Haiti since the earthquake. Source: AFP.

900.  Number of latrines that have been dug for the people displaced from their homes.  Another 950,000 people still need sanitation. Source: New York Times.

75.   An hourly wage of 75 cents per hour is paid by the United Nations Development Program to people in Haiti who have been hired to help in the clean up.   The UNDP is paying 30,000 people to help clean up Haiti, 180 Haitian Gourdes ($4.47) for six hours of work.  The program hopes to hire 100,000 people.  Source: United Nations News Briefing.

1.25.   The U.S. is pledged to spend as much as $379 million in Haitian relief.  This is about $1.25 for each person in the United States. Source:   Canadian Press.

1.  For every one dollar of U.S. aid to Haiti, 42 cents is for disaster assistance, 33 cents is for the U.S. military, 9 cents is for food, 9 cents is to transport the food, 5 cents to pay Haitians to help with recovery effort, 1 cent is for the Haitian government and ½ a cent is for the government of the Dominican Republic.  Source:  Associated Press.

via Bill Quigley: Haiti by the Numbers.

Sounding on Anthropology and Archaeology for February 8, 2010

In sounding on February 8, 2010 at 3:14 pm

Sounding: in general

In sounding on January 20, 2010 at 11:50 am

Sounding on Haiti 1/18/2010

In sounding on January 18, 2010 at 11:22 am
  • And still more about aid for Haiti. Bhikkhu Bodhi has a few words, in an interview with Rev. Danny Fisher. [link] Also, if you are, like me, concerned with labor rights and thinking ahead to resisting the inevitable, constant, recurring attempts of foreign businesses to turn this human tragedy into yet another business opportunity, please read this appeal, and consider giving your aid monies to the rank-and-file union Batay Ouvriye.

BATAY OUVRIYE is an organization that regroups factory unions and committees, workers’ associations and militants, all struggling in Haiti for the construction of an independent, combative and democratic union movement, and to organize wage-workers, self-employed workers as well as the unemployed for the defense of their rights. Theorganization is an alternative to the traditional bureaucratic, corrupt union movement that upholds the dominant classes’ power amongst the exploited masses of Haiti. Not only does it take the initiative of developing spontaneous direct issue struggles, but also it incites the working class to fight and to organize themselves to defend their independent interests. Batay Ouvriye also links these particular struggles with those, more wide-ranging, of the people. In this sense, it takes part in all types of popular democratic struggles by encouraging the involvement of workers.
[text from Miami Autonomy & Solidarity]

Still More on Haiti

In comment on January 15, 2010 at 2:25 pm

I’ve avoided mentioning Pat Robertson’s energetic kick to his own tonsils here, for the same reasons I avoided mentioning Brit Hume’s awesome attempt to evangelize Tiger Woods – it’s obvious, and the world doesn’t need more commentary on such obvious bone-headed racism and arrogance. Still, found this via anthropophagus, and thought it represented my own thoughts on the matter rather nicely, to wit:

The racism implicit in Robertson and those like him both secular and New Age is obvious. If a nation of black slaves threw off the shackles of imperialism and slavery, they did so only by a pact with the devil. They are a nation of cursed, wretched people who are worthy of only a sort of detached, preaching pity.

via The Haiti Disaster and Superstition – Anarkismo.

And, if that weren’t enough, go read Tenured Radical‘s response to the way this is being covered in the MSM:

Why do even good news reports allow US government officials talk unchallenged about the grossly underdeveloped economy in Haiti, which amplifies disasters like the recent earthquake because of substandard housing and thin state resources that snap when taxed, as if it has nothing to do with centuries of European and American colonialism? In this story Timothy Carney, who was the U.S. Ambassador to Haiti from 1998-1999, speaks of the Duvalier regimes as emblematic of Haitian governments who “bled their people dry.” Well yes, but weren’t the Duvaliers and others virtually in the formal employ of Cold War-era United States foreign aid programs while they did that? And didn’t the United States think that an oligarchical regime that kept its people brutally policed was a good defense against Communism? And didn’t the the United States keep Haiti in its thrall by foisting a crushing load of international debt on the country that was banked by its rulers in Geneva as the country’s infrastructure collapsed?

Art for Haiti by Ricardo Levins Morales

In comment on January 15, 2010 at 10:22 am

This poster is sold signed. Half of the proceeds goes to Partners in Health for earth quake relief. PIH is the grassroots organization established in Haiti by Dr. Paul Farmer. It is Haitian-led and provides direct assistance in Haitian communities without the costs of an administrative bureaucracy. [link]

Morales is a famous local printmaker and artist, whose work you may very well have seen previously.  He’s recently opened up a new operation, after the previous one with which he was affiliated closed its doors.

Ill Doctrine on Haiti

In comment on January 15, 2010 at 9:45 am

Man I love Jay Smooth. He also quotes from Wordsworth’s stunning poem to the great Haitian revolutionary Toussaint L’Ouverture (referenced in the video above). I’m going to quote the whole poem:

TO TOUSSAINT L’OUVERTURE

TOUSSAINT, the most unhappy of men! 1
Whether the whistling Rustic tend his plough
Within thy hearing, or thy head be now
Pillowed in some deep dungeon’s earless den; -
O miserable Chieftain! where and when
Wilt thou find patience? Yet die not; do thou
Wear rather in thy bonds a cheerful brow:
Though fallen thyself, never to rise again,
Live, and take comfort. Thou hast left behind
Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies;
There’s not a breathing of the common wind
That will forget thee; thou hast great allies;
Thy friends are exultations, agonies,
And love, and man’s unconquerable mind.

SOUNDING for Week Ending 1/15/2010

In sounding on January 14, 2010 at 1:31 pm

Cambodia

KI-Media consolidated a series of youtube clips from a French-language documentary film about the Khmer Republic under Lon Nol, from 1970-1975. Very worth checking out, especially if you can understand French. [link]

Whenever the topic of the Khmer Rouge comes up, you’re bound to hear someone impugn Noam Chomsky as a Khmer Rouge apologist. Here’s a new review of the evidence, which seems pretty evenhanded to me. Check it out. [link]

Milton Osborne wrote an essay on “The Mekong River Under Threat” for Asia-Pacific Journal, reprinted here in Japan Focus. Milton Osborne, “The Mekong River Under Threat,” The Asia-Pacific Journal, 2-2-10, January 11, 2010. [link]

Important statements from Chea Mony, president of the Free Trade Union Workers of the Kingdom of Cambodia (FTUWKC), on the reason why there were fewer labor actions in this last year:

The president of the Cambodian Free Trade Union of Workers stated that there were more than 100 demonstrations and strikes held by workers in 2009, but this number is less than in previous years. However, the decline in numbers is not due to better working conditions, but due to restrictions imposed by the government on demonstrations and strikes, especially due to suppression of workers movements by the local authorities. [Daem Ampil, translated by the Mirror. link]

Mony has also written to the US government asking for them to drop all export tariffs from Cambodian goods to the US. [link]

The International Republican Institute (IRI), rather infamous among those who pay attention, even rising to the level of international scrutiny during the US 2008 presidential election (McCain is a booster), declares that Cambodia’s government just keeps getting better. Read it here. [link]

Buddhist

Thich Nhat Hanh has finally spoken out forcefully, laying the blame for the violent evictions of students, monks, and nuns in Vietnam, upon mobs for hire at the command of the Vietnamese government. This is important; wait for more. [link]

Another positive review of Anne Hansen’s excellent book How To Behave, by Craig Reynolds. [link] I reviewed Hansen’s book previously for the Journal of Asian Studies, 67.3, pp. 1123-1127.

World

Of course, the biggest news of the week is the unimaginable devastation ongoing in Haiti. It’s unbearable. Please consider giving money to worthwhile organizations.  William Easterly, the most prominent critic of bad development aid and proponent of effective aid, has a blog called “Aid Watch.” Over there, Laura Freschi has published suggestions.  Please take a moment. [link] Avaaz has other good suggestions [link]. You might also read Anthroman’s reflections on Pat Robertson’s horrific comments.

Thinking

Not that this is really news, but the World Food Program announced the other day that of all the world’s hungry people, three-quarters are the rural poor. [link]

I’m digging on the Middle Mekong Archaeological Project’s weblog. Check out these two posts: Guano and sacrificial pigs, and A family in every pot. The latter includes this awesome, death-related, photograph.

Oh yes, Google might stop helping the PRC censor its citizens. [link]

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