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Religious (Studies) Board Games

In comment on October 27, 2014 at 6:44 pm

Where’ve I been? I wish I could say I’d been playing board games, but alas – no.  My book is almost complete, and will enter into production soon! I also have some things to say about a neat story out of Oakland in the next few days.  I’m gearing up to teach Caillois and Huizinga in my class on Ritual tomorrow, partly through this excellent reading of Caillois by a video game designer (!!). But for now, here’s a list of noteworthy (not necessarily an endorsement!) Religion or Religious Studies-esque Board Games. Also note that there aren’t enough games from outside the Abrahamic traditions, and I wasn’t gonna throw “Chutes in Ladders” in there just for historical resonance. Suggestions? Links? Throw ‘em in the comments, friends.

Playing Gods.

Playing Gods is a satirical board game of divine domination. Two to five players each play a different god, and compete with each other to take over the world. This is done by spreading your believers, converting the followers of other gods, or killing them off with Acts of God.

Playing Gods also has an open-ended structure that encourages player creativity. For example, players may choose to be a figurehead of one of the five main religions, or they may choose to create their own gods – or even be their own god! In the Expansion Pack, artistic and creative players may even write and design their own cards.

Here I Stand: Wars of the Reformation.

The lineage of Here I Stand includes descent from both SPI’s A Mighty Fortress (published in 1977) and GMT’s The Napoleonic Wars (2002). Reusing the theme of A Mighty Fortress, the game improves on its predecessor with a much deeper system to handle religious conversions, the additions of New World exploration and Mediterranean piracy, and the explicit inclusion of minor powers that can be coerced into the conflict through card play. Borrowed from The Napoleonic Wars is the use of important cities to determine economic strength and elements of the land combat, avoid battle, and interception systems. Many game mechanics borrowed from The Napoleonic Wars were simplified to ensure a fast-paced game despite the wide range of factor considered by this design. From this base, the game adds mechanics unique to the 16th Century, including heavy use of short-term (and unreliable!) mercenaries, explicit wintering of armies, and the mercurial nature of siege operations, especially against targets that can be resupplied by sea. Here I Stand is an innovative game system, being the first to integrate religion, politics, economics and diplomacy in a card-driven design. Games vary in length from 3-4 hours for a tournament scenario up to full campaign games that run about twice the time. Rules to play games with 2, 3, 4, or 5 players are also included. The 3-player game is just as well balanced as the standard 6-player configuration, taking advantage of the natural alliances of the period.

The Virgin Queen: Wars of Religion.

Virgin Queen: Wars of Religion 1559-1598 is a game of grand strategy for two to six players based on the military, political and religious conflicts within Europe during the reigns of Elizabeth I of England and Philip II of Spain. Each player controls one or more of the major powers that presided over European politics in that day. Spain is the juggernaut, able to draw upon the vast riches of their global empire. But such a dominant power is sure to have many enemies. The Ottoman expansion towards Spain’s Mediterranean outposts remains unchecked. Elizabeth’s English sea dogs are poised to raid Spain’s overseas empire. And the forces of Protestant reform will soon drag Spain into eighty years of rebellion in the Netherlands. Will Spain find aid from its Catholic allies? Perhaps not from France, where the Catholic Valois dynasty is soon to engage another group of Protestant believers in the bloody French Wars of Religion. And even Philip’s relatives in Vienna who rule the Holy Roman Empire may dabble in the Protestant faith instead of remaining loyal to their Catholic heritage and Spanish brethren. Virgin Queen is the sequel to Here I Stand, another card-driven game of grand strategy that covered the previous forty years (from Martin Luther’s posting of his 95 Theses in 1517 through the abdication of Charles V in 1556). Players familiar with Here I Stand will find much that is familiar in Virgin Queen: over half of the rulebook remains unchanged. New game systems have been put in place to emphasize the changing nature of the conflicts here in the late 16th Century

A Game For Good Christians.

It all started playing a game of Cards Against Humanity when someone’s “horrible” card pairing was vaguely biblical and deeply spiritual. One of us said, “imagine if this entire game was based completely on passages from the Bible?” Hours later a midnight phone call began A Game For Good Christians, but it truly goes back further than this.

This game was developed through years of many irreverent and deeply theological conversations; Bible studies, seminary classes, sermons, readings and reflections are at the root of this game, as is deep exploration of the Bible.

The cards capture stories, characters, and statements from the Bible. Some familiar and comforting, others frightening and confusing. Those who have been uncomfortable playing this game have had the most trouble with Canon Cards which quote directly from the Bible without any clever commentary from us.

The Bible, like humanity, is messy because it contains the messy relationship between the divine and humanity: a relationship which is humorous and horrifying. Our game embraces this dissonance. We ask you to do the same.

We are Christians, designers, teachers, preachers, parents, artists, seminary students, male and female, Jew and Gentile, and no respecters of persons.

The only Christian game not afraid of the Bible!

See Religion Dispatches on the game.

Settlers of Canaan.

The settlers of canaan takes place in the territory of canaan off the coast of the great sea. Each player represents a tribe of Israel seeking to settle in canaan guide your tribe through the fertile lands of canaan. Each hex space will yield resources that you can cash in for roads, settlements and cities. Harvest resources of stone and ore from the land to help build Jerusalem and receive king david’s blessing. Harvest timber, grain, wool, and brick to build more roads and settlements to expand your territory work quickly your opponents are moving to settle the most fertile parts of canaan you also need to be wary a plague could come upon you at any time and destroy your harvest. Based on settlers of catan. For 3-4 players. Biblical theme.

A.D. 30:

Walk With Jesus to Jerusalem is a very reverent solitaire game that takes you, as the player, along the travels of Jesus, from His baptism in the River Jordan to His triumphant entry into Jerusalem. Along the way, you will make decisions which will affect the outcome of His journeys and teachings. Thirteen possible alternate outcomes are included not to imply that other outcomes were in fact possible, but to build a strategy game that includes challenges with possibility of success and failure as the player of the game. Achieving the Major Victory (the historical outcomes) will demonstrate the extraordinary set of circumstances that took place and were necessary to achieve the birth of Christianity.

The events that take place often cause the political and religious leaders of the area (represented by Caiaphas, Herod Antipas, and Pontius Pilate in the game) to take notice and become increasingly concerned. In game terms, this is shown by moving those Leader markers along a track on the game board, advancing them from their start spaces one step at a time until they reach the final space on that track (“Arrest in Jerusalem”), at which point they attempt to arrest Jesus.

You get the chance to react to these movements with several choices each game turn. The goal is to assemble all twelve apostles, maintain a high level of piety, and enter into Jerusalem. Additionally, when trying to reconstruct the beginnings of Christianity historically, it is imperative that Judas betrays Jesus in Jerusalem. Events tend to push Jesus towards Jerusalem, but try to avoid entering too early before all the important pieces are in place!

Solomon’s Temple.

Solomon’s Temple is a board game of strategy and fun! Each player has his or her own deck of cards and game board. Your goal is to build and furnish the Temple of Solomon while at the same time fighting off invading Babylonian armies (that your opponent controls!). Mix in prophets, priests, Kings, altars and offerings, and the task becomes even more difficult! Do you have what it takes to defend the city and complete the temple in time? (Redemption® fans will want to note that Solomon’s Temple is the only place you can find the promotional King David and King Solomon Redemption® cards!) Board game for 2 players ages 7 and up. Average 1 hour game.

Kalua Board Game.

On the tropical island of Kalua, different religions compete to become the one and only religion. You will take the role of one of the Gods that Kaluans follow and you will reward your families with good harvests, nice weather and general well-being or punish them with famine, epidemics floods and other disasters if they do not pray to you enough; but do not forget that there are other Gods on the island and Kaluans cannot tell where all their bad luck is coming from.

Opus Dei.

Opus-Dei: Existence After Religion is an atheist-themed game (with no affiliation with the catholic organisation Prelatura del Opus Dei) built around the world of philosophy though no philosophical knowledge is needed to play as it is a purely strategy-based game. The philosophical foundation is however only the beginning the next steps include expansion sets that explore historical events politicians artists musicians writers and revolutionaries of all kind. Opus-Dei: Existence After Religion is a new entertaining and irreverent card game that takes place in a universe where religion is almost completely something of the past. In this world without religious dogma the players represent rival Zeitgeists (German Time-Spirits) competing in a battle of rational ideas to maintain ethics morals and meaningful lives for all by virtue of reason! When playing the game a queue of potentially existing philosophers scientists and fools are lined up for each round. These humans are worth varying amounts of points according to their intellectual status and magnitude. It is then up to each Zeitgeist in their turn to create the best of them into their particular World by playing up to two cards that can serve their best interests. The player with the most points at the end of the game wins!

There’s Nothing Easier Than Making a Zombi

In comment on February 19, 2014 at 11:57 am

Fantasies of black magic have it all wrong: there’s nothing easier than making a zombi – an individual devoid of interest, love,
consciousness, compassion, and strength. Real magic is the capacity to take the zombi population which surrounds us, which lives predatory in our own hearts, and bring them back to life.

Buddha Relics Stolen, Recovered. Implications?

In cambodia on February 7, 2014 at 2:55 pm

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Then-King NORODOM Sihanouk holding the koṭṭha (urn) containing the Buddha’s relics

Back on December 9-10, 2013, in the midst of ongoing conflicts between the CNRP and the CPP over the disputed elections, and separate but connected mass garment worker strikes, physical relics of the Buddha, supposed to contain hair, bone, and ashes of the historical Sakyamuni Buddha, were stolen. Yesterday, February 6, 2014, police claimed to have recovered these relics in Takeo province. Before proceeding to links and discussion, it might be useful to discuss the concept of relics in general. More after the jump:

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